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Alternate Endings to… God of War III

Alternate Endings to… God of War III

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Kratos fights his way through Hades to the very peak of Mount Olympus, slaying gods and being rather violent all the way to the top. But what would we think of him if the ending to the game were different to that which actually happens? We’re not going to ruin the real ending, but we will suggest some alternatives for you to peruse at your leisure:

Battling his way to Zeus’ palace on the top of Mount Olympus, Kratos enters into an epic, climactic battle with the God of Gods. On defeating the beardy Greek lord, Kratos decides he will now take on the Hindu Gods and Godesses. This sets us up for at least another trilogy, and probably a lot more.

It turns out Zeus and Kratos are actually long-lost lovers and their fury at each other was actually thinly-veiled sexual tension. Needless to say, they hook up.

On defeating Zeus, Kratos heads home. He decides to have a bath, which washes the filthy ashes from his skin and (thanks to the magic of herbal infusions in the bath salts) calms him down.

Zeus lays dead at the feet of a victorious Kratos. The camera pans up the blood-soaked body of the Spartan and settles on his face, with Kratos still looking as furious as ever. Suddenly, a smile cracks across his mouth, he reaches for his face and – in a scene reminiscent of the earlier encounter with Helios – tears his own head from his body. It doesn’t take the player long to realise, though, that there is another head below what was thought to be Kratos’. The camera loses focus for a second before readjusting and showing who it was in the Angry Man costume all along: Dante of Inferno fame. It turns out the entire God of War series was actually a drawn-out marketing campaign by EA for Dante’s Inferno. The player feels cheated.

The ending is carried out as normal, but at the end of the credits a teaser trailer runs for the unannounced sequel: James Pond: Cod of War.

The ending is carried out as normal, but at the end of the credits nothing happens.

As you can see, they’re probably the greatest feats of end-writing ever committed to blog.




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